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fueled by bias, whether that's racial, ethnic, religious, or against the lgbq community. amina, you said bias is often fueled by misinformation. >> certainly in the muslim community that's very obvious. since 9-11 that's increased but even before 9-11 there were so many stereotypes out there, whether from hollywood, which portrayed muslim as terrorists, as womanizers, to just a host of campaigns over the last few years from the ground zero mosque to the koran burning, local and national campaigns against building mosques, all of these are obviously going to impact children and their parents and if they are at home hearing their parents talk about muslims in a certain way, they are going to take that to school with them. i have experienced this in my own growing up, which was long before 9-11, just the lack of information or the misinformation i experienced again with my own children, particularly when there's an event that happens overseas they will come to school and kids will reflect that in comments about did your parents commit another terrorist act, was that your dad that did this.
today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been able to take that mission and bring it into the community through really dynamic partnership with the experts in the field. about 14 years ago, tommy short, my friend in the audience, came to us with sheriff hennesy and asked us to take on a controversial topic of violence and it was 14 years ago we hosted stamp out violence today. we brought together victims of violence, offenders, community leaders working on this issue to raise awareness about the impact of violence in our community. at that time the message was violence is learned and can be unlearned. the thing that the giants have and the reason why we're
out there in the last few years really increasing along with the kinds of things that amina talked about, very anti-immigrant messages coming out in the media. in new york, you probably remember this, some of you, in 2008 high school students were going out on a weekly basis beating up immigrants that they thought were supposedly undocumented immigrants. the students all knew about this but the adults didn't. it results in a hate crime, a murder. a couple things i wanted to bring up. what does it take to unseat bias? first of all, we have to look at all the places that people are getting that violence, those attitudes, and have dialogue about it. just like amina said, we need to be getting to know each other. some researchers back in the 40's came up with 4 important things to address prejudice. the first is getting it know each other, talking about it, getting it out in the open. the second is equal status, we're not just feeling sorry for those poor little whatevers that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the gian
have dialogue about it. just like amina said, we need to be getting to know each other. some researchers back in the 40's came up with 4 important things to address prejudice. the first is getting it know each other, talking about it, getting it out in the open. the second is equal status, we're not just feeling sorry for those poor little whatevers that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the giants, we're all for the team, not all together not as if we are color blind and color doesn't exist but with our diversity. the fourth is with power and authority, the person who stands up and says this is what needs to happen, like a school principal who says we're not going to let kids go around the school saying that's okay, all these things are needed. >> i like that, that's great. something that really resonated with me that tom said, if you simply tolerate diversity you are aspiring to mediocrity. can you talk about the ambassadors, adults taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are hum
kids just like you have been going to pbskids.org. take a look! amina sent in this story with these great pictures! you can do it, too, but first, let's see what amina made. supermom saves the day! you can make a story like that, too by going to pbskids.org. this next story is from sofia. that was fun! you can do great things, too, at pbskids.org. (kids laughing) word world is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the u.s. department of education. (school bell rings) kids: school!
to be a panelist. >> rick, amina or stacy, anything you with like to share from your personal experiences? ?oo >> speaking about your personal life in front of people you know or don't know isn't always an easy thing, you wouldn't know by looking at me but i'm an immigrant. i wasment born in the united statesment i came to this country, to california, when i was a 10-year-old with a single mother and two small brothers living in a motel. my first experience at public school, i must have had a kick me sign on my back because being difficult, as you would understand, made me a target and that imprint stayed with me for many years and guided me in a very dysfunctional angry self-loathing kind of way as many children do. today, 160,000 kids are not in public school because they are afraid of what someone might say or do to them. so that lives in me and like some of you and your own stories, i was fortunate enough to use it to become a teacher, a principal, and assistant superintendent of public schools and now a nonprofit director whose single mission is to do what we're doing to make sure kids
$150,000 extra. some restaurants explain the disparity. the president of the amina group has more than enough money set aside for the employee health care because unused funds roll over from previous years. >> all the money that have been collected remain in a cash reserve account for the employees to draw upon. >> reporter: the general manager said that they stopped charging customers for it in december of 2011 and the cheesecake factory funds more for their employees health care than the industry's standard. there is a loophole in san francisco's universal health care law. it allows the restaurant to legally keep any surcharge money they collect if it is not used in two years. some city leaders are trying to close that loophole. sharon chin, cbs 5. >>> we're getting word tonight that brian stowe has taken a turn for the worse. he has been receiving treatment for a large blood clot. his doctors are amazed he even survived the clot given its size. he suffered severe brain damage after a beating outside dodger's stadium nearly two years ago. >>
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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